Anemia treatment available online today

Request treatment for anemia online from our trusted, board-certified doctors and find relief today. Get a new prescription to treat anemia or refill an existing prescription today.*

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Forms of anemia are serious and can become life threatening

Effective supplements and dietary changes

Personalized care for various anemia types

*Prescriptions are provided at the doctor’s discretion. Learn more about our controlled substances policy and how you can save up to 80% with our prescription discount card. PlushCare doctors cannot treat all cases of anemia. Our primary care physicians can conduct an initial evaluation of your symptoms, but may need to refer you to a specialist or for in-person treatment. If you are experiencing life-threatening symptoms, seek emergency medical attention immediately.

Learn about anemia

Anemia is a blood disorder in which your body lacks healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen to the various organs in your body for proper functioning. According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, anemia affects more than 3 million Americans. 

Anemia causes

In general, anemia occurs when your body:

  • Makes inadequate red blood cells (RBCs)

  • Destroys too many RBCs in a short period of time

  • Loses too many RBCs (blood loss)


According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood institute, many types of anemia exist, each with its own cause. The different forms of anemia are: iron-deficiency anemia, pernicious anemia, aplastic anemia, and hemolytic anemia.

  • Iron deficiency anemia

    This is the most common type of anemia. As the name implies, iron deficiency anemia occurs when there is insufficient iron in the body. Iron is needed to make hemoglobin. Causes of iron deficiency can be blood loss or poor absorption of iron.

  • Vitamin deficiency anemia

    This type of anemia results from low levels of vitamin B12 (folate/folic acid), usually due to poor dietary intake. Another similar anemia is pernicious anemia, in which vitamin B12 deficiency is due to poor absorption in the gastrointestinal tract.

  • Aplastic anemia

    Aplastic anemia occurs when the blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow are not producing enough red blood cells. The destruction or deficiency of blood-forming stem cells in your bone marrow can be due to the following causes:

    • Autoimmune disorders (where the immune system attacks stem cells)

    • Exposure to toxic chemicals or drugs

    • Exposure radiation

    • Viral infections

  • Hemolytic anemia

    Hemolytic anemia occurs when the red blood cells are broken down (lysed) faster than bone marrow can replace them. Several factors can contribute to the accelerated red blood cell destruction, including:

    • Infections

    • Aneurysms or leaky heart valves

    • Abnormalities in the red blood cell structure

    • Autoimmune disorders

    Sickle cell anemia also falls under hemolytic anemia. The abnormal red blood cell structure (sickle shape) is a genetic trait that is inherited.

Anemia symptoms

  • Due to the lack of red blood cells and oxygen delivery to the various organs in the body, some general symptoms of all types of anemia include:

    • Feeling cold, particularly in hands or feet

    • Feeling tired/fatigued

    • Shortness of breath

    • Feeling weak

    • Dizziness

    • Irregular or fast heartbeat

    • Pale skin

    • Chest pain

How to treat anemia

Treatments for anemia, which depend on the cause, range from taking supplements to having medical procedures. For treatment of aplastic anemia and hemolytic anemia, your doctor may recommend blood transfusions to increase red blood cells levels or a bone marrow transplant.

Genetic disorders, such as sickle cell anemia, can also be treated by bone marrow transplant. Hemolytic anemia due to mechanical factors such as a leaky heart valve may require a heart or vascular specialist. Iron deficiency anemia due to blood loss will require surgery to go in to stop the blood loss.

Anemia medication

  • Iron supplements

    For iron deficiency anemia due to poor diet or inability to properly absorb iron, iron supplements or diet changes are recommended.

  • Vitamin B-12 supplements

    Similar to iron deficiency, for vitamin deficiency anemia, vitamin B12 supplements and dietary changes are recommended.

  • Folate supplements

    Treatment for folic acid deficiency includes folate supplements and increasing these nutrients in your diet.

  • Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents

    In the case which blood transfusions are not possible, erythropoetin-stimulating agents can be an alternative. Erythropoetin-stimulating agents can be given to stimulate the production of red blood cells by the bone marrow.

How to prevent anemia

You might be able to prevent some types of anemia by eating a healthy, varied diet. Specifically, anemia due to nutritional deficiency may be prevented by increasing intake of the following food:

  • Food with high levels of iron (dark green leafy vegetables, red meat)

  • Food with vitamin B12 (meat)

  • Food with folic acid (dark leafy vegetables, legumes)

Daily multivitamins may help prevent nutritional anemias, but always check with your doctor before taking them.

When to see a doctor for anemia

You should speak with a doctor if you are feeling tired all the time and don't know why.

Anemia treatment FAQs

  • What is the best treatment for anemia?

    The best treatment for anemia depends on the cause and can range from taking supplements to having medical procedures. If the anemia is related to nutrient deficiency, nutrient supplementation and diet changes are the best treatment. For treatment of aplastic anemia and hemolytic anemia, your doctor may recommend blood transfusions to increase red blood cells levels or a bone marrow transplant.

  • What is the best medication for anemia?

    The best medication for anemia depends on the cause. If the anemia is related to nutrient deficiency, nutrient supplementation and diet change is the best treatment. For treatment of aplastic anemia and hemolytic anemia, if blood transfusions are not possible, erythropoetin-stimulating agents are the best treatment to stimulate the production of red blood cells by the bone marrow.

  • What is the fastest way to cure anemia?

    For iron deficiency anemia, the fastest way to raise iron levels is through regular iron supplementation. In addition, you can also increase your dietary intake of iron rich foods such as red meat, dark green leafy vegetables, and iron fortified cereals.

  • Is anemia curable?

    This depends on the type of anemia. Some types of anemia are mild and short term with proper treatment, such as iron / vitamin deficiency anemia. But some types of anemia, such as sickle cell anemia, are life long and serious.

  • How serious is being anemic?

    Being anemic means the organs in your body are not getting enough oxygen. As a result, you can become weak and immunocompromised. Some forms of anemia are serious and can become life threatening. Acute severe anemia due to sudden loss of blood can be fatal. Sickle cell anemia can lead to complications.

3 simple steps to request treatment for anemia today

Step 1: Book an appointment

Step 1

Book an anemia consultation appointment.

Book a same day appointment from anywhere.

Step 2: Visit with a doctor on your smartphone

Step 2

Talk to your medical provider regarding your anemia symptoms.

Visit with a doctor on your smartphone or computer.

Step 3: pick up at local pharmacy

Step 3

If prescribed, pick up prescription for anemia treatment.

We can send prescriptions to any local pharmacy.

Related conditions to anemia

  • HIV & AIDS

    An HIV infection can disrupt the immune system's proper functioning, increase red blood cell lysis (hemolysis), or cause ineffective red blood cell production. As such, anemia is a common complication of HIV infection.

  • Crohn's disease

    For people with Crohn's disease, the blood vessels in the digestive tract can rupture leading to blood loss. As a result of this blood loss, people with Crohn's disease have a high risk of developing iron deficiency anemia.

  • Rheumatoid arthritis

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that cause pain and inflammation of the joints of your fingers, wrists, knees, feet and toes. As a result, patients typically take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain management and to reduce inflammation. However, NSAIDS can also cause bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract, leading to blood loss. As a result, people with RA also can develop iron deficiency anemia.

  • Kidney disease

    People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at greater risk of developing anemia. This is because the kidneys are not producing adequate erythropoietin that stimulate the production of red blood cells by the bone marrow.

Anemia treatment pricing details

How pricing works

To request anemia treatment and get a new or refill on your prescription, join our monthly membership and get discounted visits

Paying with insurance

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$16.99/month

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Visit price with insurance

Often the same as an office visit. Most patients with in-network insurance pay $30 or less!

  • We accept these insurance plans and many more:

    • Humana
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Paying without insurance

Membership

$16.99/month

First month free

Visits

$129

30 days of free membership

  • Same-day appointments 7 days a week

  • Unlimited messages with your Care Team

  • Prescription discount card to save up to 80%

  • Exclusive discounts on lab tests

  • Free memberships for your family

  • Cancel anytime

Visit price without insurance

Initial visits are $129.

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Anemia treatment resources

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PlushCare content is reviewed by MDs, PhDs, NPs, nutritionists, and other healthcare professionals. Learn more about our editorial standards and meet the medical team. The PlushCare site or any linked materials are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment.